When Tooro’s Princess Komuntale and Dallas Kids reveled in Christmas vibes

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Tooro Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale

 

By EADM Correspondent

In Summary: They gathered as a family. The ambiance was as welcoming as it was ecstatic.  No pomp. No hoopla. But the exuberance of love and joy was so infectious.  Everybody, children and parents felt the love and warmth in the air; they were in good company and indeed, at home.  It was Advent. The decorations were consistent with the colors of the season; red, blue, pink, rose, and others. Christmas carols played in the background and images projected on a screen to fully capture and reflect the festive mood. It was an atmosphere filled with love, joy, peace, and hope. Christmas was two days away.  An assortment of gifts, drinks, and snacks filled a section of the room. Expectant children and their parents were as excited as the shoppers downtown Dallas and Fort Worth.  The long-awaited moment for the children from several Diaspora communities living in the Dallas Fort Worth (DFW) area to revel in Christmas vibes with Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale of Tooro in Western Uganda had finally arrived. Elegantly dressed in an African attire (kitengi) that matched her light-skinned color and flashing smiles at the enthused audience, her natural beauty was unmistakable.  With a royal gait, she walked into the medium-sized room that was filled to capacity that gave her a rousing welcome. This was her first public appearance to preside over an event as the new face of “Tooro in the United States.  Now in the throes of making a fresh start in the USA, there is no role more fitting for her than that of the most authentic and eligible face of Tooro Kingdom. Yet, it was not lost on the organizers and the audience to make it clear that Jesus was the reason for the season. Jesus was the best Gift we had to unwrap during Christmas. He was the greatest Gift ever given. He is the true embodiment of love, joy, peace, and hope

Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale with some of the children and  their parents at the Christmas program at the Quality Inn Hotel in Hurst, Texas

Hurst, Texas— the first-ever Christmas program for Children of Diaspora communities living within the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) area to revel in Christmas vibes with Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale of Tooro finally arrived on Sunday, two days before Christmas. They gathered as a family. The ambiance was as welcoming as it was ecstatic.  No pomp. No hoopla. But the exuberance of love and joy was so infectious.  Everybody, children and parents felt the love and warmth in the air; they were in good company and indeed, at home. 


A cross-section of the children and parents at the Christmas program held at the Quality Inn Hotel in Hurst, Texas. 

It was Advent. The decorations were consistent with the colors of the season; red, blue, pink, rose, and others. Christmas carols played in the background and images projected on a screen to fully capture and reflect the festive mood. It was an atmosphere filled with love, joy, peace, and hope.   Christmas was two days away.

Some of the children with gifts that were handed out by Princess Ruth Komuntale.

 An assortment of gifts, drinks, and snacks filled a section of the room. A large size banner with the emblem and flag of Tooro Kingdom hang on the wall in front of the room. Two flags; the Ugandan and American were hoisted on either side of the banner. Expectant children and their parents were as excited as the shoppers downtown Dallas and Fort Worth.   The rare moment to revel in Christmas vibes with the Princess of Tooro was finally here. Elegantly dressed in African attire (kitengi) that matched her light-skinned color and flashing smiles at the enthused audience, her natural beauty was unmistakable. 

The banner with the emblem and flag of Tooro Kingdom and the two flags of the United States and Uganda hoisted on either side of the banner

With a royal gait, she walked into the medium-sized room that was filled to capacity that gave her a rousing welcome.   Flanked by the chief organizer Rev. Joseph Kamugisha, Princess Vivian Komukyeya Matovu, and Mr. Frank Sentamu, Princess Komuntale, now back and living in the United States to make a fresh start, there is no role more fitting for her than that of the most authentic and eligible face of Tooro Kingdom. Yet, it was not lost on the organizers and the audience to make it clear that Jesus was the reason for the season. Jesus is the best Gift we can unwrap this Christmas. He’s the greatest Gift ever given. He is the true embodiment of love, joy, peace, and hope we should all aspire for.

Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale with some of the children and their parents at the Christmas program

For political correctness, the three anthems for the United States, Uganda, and the Kingdom of Tooro were sung by the audience at the event held at the Quality Inn Hotel in Hurst, Texas. A cross-section of residents and children from several Diaspora communities living within the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) area attended the event. The majority of the children were from Uganda, the hosts, and organizers and joined by others from Kenya, Nigeria, Canada, and Rwanda. During the simple but colorful ceremony, an assortment of gifts donated by individuals and organizations were presented to the children by Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale of the Tooro Kingdom who presided over the ceremony. Princess Komuntale is the elder sister of Omukama Oyo Nyimba Kabamba Iguru of Tooro, 26, the youngest reigning monarch in the world.

Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale with the newly appointed representative of Tooro Kingdom to the southwest region of the United States Rev. Joseph Kamgisha at the event

Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale, 30, now a resident of the DFW area, by all accounts, is the most visible face of the Tooro Kingdom in the United States of America.  During the ceremony, she was flanked at the event by Princess Vivian Komucheya Matovu and Mr. Frank Sentamu, the deputy representative of the Kabaka of Buganda to the South-West region of the United States including Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas. Mr. Sentamu stood in for Dr. Abu Senkayi who was unable to attend the event due to a family emergency.

Princess Ruth Komuntale with Princess Vivian Komukyeya Matovu

The ceremony was organized by Rev. Joseph William Kamugisha, a long-time resident of the area and a passionate supporter of children’s’ self-actualization.  A spiritual leader, philanthropist, community leader, and human rights activist, Rev. Joseph William Kamugisha mooted the idea of bringing together children from the various Diaspora communities in the area, help them cut across their cultural and church boundaries during the festive season, and share with them love, joy, peace, and hope; reasons why Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ on Christmas.

Rev. Joseph William Kamugisha, the newly appointed representative of the Tooro Kingdom to the southwest region of the United States and chief organizer of the Children’s Christmas program.

“Sharing the love of Christ by giving gifts to children from our Diaspora communities is what informed the organization of this event,” Rev. Kamugisha told the EADM in an interview.

Rev. Joseph William Kamugisha and his wife Naomi Kamugisha (far left) played a pivotal role in organizing and staging the Christmas program for the children in the DFW area.

Rev. Kamugisha disclosed that although the organizers knew that the children were receiving presents from their churches and families, they thought that a community event would make Christmas more meaningful if children were brought together, help them to interact, span cultural boundaries, and to receive presents from a member of a royal family from Uganda in Africa. That way, Rev. Kamugisha added, the children would appreciate that although we are culturally different, we are all the same; children of God just as Jesus Christ who was born on Christmas. The man of God then declared: “Jesus is the best Gift we can unwrap this Christmas. He is the greatest Gift ever given. He is the reason for the season. Merry Christmas!”


Princess Vivian Komukyeya Matovu with some of the children at the event

 Rev. Joseph Kamugisha expressed his deepest appreciation to the sponsors of the event who he described as organizations, men, and women that reflected the true heart of Christmas; love. Some of the organizations and individuals who made contributions of various forms towards the program included Texas Family Fitness Center in Bedford, Albertson's Store in Bedford, the New Hope Class at the ArborLawn Methodist Church in Fort Worth, the Tex Care Group of Companies founded and owned by Robert Lubega, the Ship Print LLC of Mr. Fred Kamanya, Brian Kwesiga, former president of UNAA,   the family of Patrick and Aisha Ogwang, Ms. Jackie Nakalema, and Mrs. Jesse Mureeba.

Mr. Robert Lubega (far right) and his wife (far left) and their children, the proprietor of the Tex Care Group of Companies made a hefty contribution towards the success of the Children’s Christmas program

Other sponsors included Ms. Sylvia Emiriate from the Kenyan Diaspora community in the DFW area, Allan Kighiga, Ph.D.,   originally from Nigeria and a member of Arise and Shine International Ministries, Mrs. Juliet Okello, and others. “Collectively, they made the event a resounding success,” Rev. Kamugisha told the EADM shortly after the event.

Mr. Fred Kamanya, seated to the right, the proprietor of Ship Print LLC whose company designed and printed the certificates handed to various individuals and organizations who generously contributed towards the success of the event.  

Earlier,  Allan Kighiga,  Ph.D., originally from Nigeria and a member of the Arise and Shine International Ministries, led the audience in prayer to thank the Almighty for sending to the world His; Son Jesus Christ to save sinners.  Dr. Allan Kighiga, a  public safety - disaster management specialist noted that  Jesus Christ left the glory of Heaven and moved into our neighborhood to bring peace and joy into our lives. Jesus came into the world because He loves to be with the ones He loves; a gift for which we should be thankful for during this Christmas season,” Dr. Allan Kighiga declared.


Ms. Sylvia Emiriate (far left) from the Kenyan Diaspora community in the DFW area donated some of the food eaten at the event, seen here receiving with her certificate of appreciation from Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale assisted by Mr. Frank Sentamu

At the request of the organizers, Samuel Muwanguzi, Ph.D. made a brief presentation on the historical ties and present-day cordial relationship between the Kingdoms of Tooro and Buganda.  The enduring ties between the two monarchies had informed the organizers to invite the representative of the Kabaka of Buganda in the area to take on the role of introducing the Princess of Tooro to the audience to present the gifts to the children. In his remarks, Dr. Muwanguzi traced the history of the Kingdom of Tooro to between 1822 and 1830 when  Prince Kaboyo Kasunsunkwanzi, the first son of Omukama Kyebambe III of Bunyoro rebelled against his father and annexed the southern part of Bunyoro Kitara kingdom and declared it an independent kingdom of Toro in 1830.

Samuel Muwanguzi, Ph.D., presented a brief account of the historical links between the Kingdoms of Buganda and Tooro dating back from 1830 to the present day.

 The rebel prince placed the northern border of the new Tooro kingdom at River Muziizi and declared himself the first Omukama of Tooro Kingdom; Rukirabasaija Omukama Kaboyo Kasunsunkwanzi Olimi I. Dr. Muwanguzi stated that the first ever contact between the Kingdoms of Buganda and Tooro was during the tumultuous reign of     Omukama Nyaika Kasunga who ascended the Toro throne after overthrowing his brother, Omubiito (Prince) Kazaana Ruhaga.

However, according to Dr. Muwanguzi, the reign of   Omukama Nyaika Kasunga came to a violent end when his brother, Omubiito Kato Rukidi, with the help of an army given to him by the Kabaka (King) of Buganda, overthrew Omukama Nyaika Kasunga. With Buganda’s intervention, Prince Kato Rukidi claimed the throne and his deposed brother, Omukama Nyaika fled to Mboga, Congo.

Some of the parents who attended the Children Christmas program

Through subsequent years, Dr. Muwanguzi told the audience, the Kingdom of Tooro became a target of the resurgent Bunyoro Kitara Kingdom under the reign of Omukama Kabalega who was determined to crush all rebel princes and totally bring to an end and reclaim the territory under the ‘renegade’ Tooro kingdom. The nascent Tooro Kingdom had nowhere else to turn for military support but to the Buganda Kingdom which frequently sent its army to help thwart attacks from Omukama Kabalega and other internal rebellions by disenchanted princes. Particularly, Dr. Muwanguzi noted that Prince Nyamuyonjo Kakende, grandson of Omukama Kaboyo Olimi I, with help of an army given to him by the Kabaka of Buganda ably resisted and drove Omukama Kabalega's army out of Tooro. After the victory, Omubiito (Prince) Kakende declared himself Omukama.

The no-nonsense Omukama Kabalega of Bunyoro Kitara sent his army to recapture the lost territories and totally bring an end to the nascent Tooro Kingdom

However, soon after, the no-nonsense Omukama Kabalega’s army attacked Tooro and forced Prince Nyamuyonjo Kakende to flee into exile in Buganda where he later died. According to Dr. Muwanguzi, the next decade was the most troubled period in the history of Tooro. Several historical accounts suggest that a number of Tooro Princes who fled into exile in Ankole were assassinated except Prince Kasagama who escaped and sought protection in Buganda.

Omukama Kasagama Kyebambe VI lived in exile in Buganda after escaping assassination in Ankole.

While in exile in Buganda, Prince Kasagama requested for military support from Lord Lugard who was engaged in operations against the expansionist Omukama Kabalega of Bunyoro.  Historical accounts suggest that Capt. Lugard offered military support to Prince Kasagama who wrested Tooro from Bunyoro and Kasagama returned home and was proclaimed Omukama Kyebambe VI.   After the threat of Kabalega’s Bunyoro was eliminated, Omukama Kasagama reigned for thirty-seven peaceful years before his death. He was succeeded by his son Prince Kamurasi Rukidi III in 1928.

Omukama Kamurasi Rukidi III studied at King’s College Budo in Buganda 

Omukama Kamurasi Rukidi III, the first Western-educated king of Tooro, studied at King’s College Budo in Buganda. Like his father, he too reigned for thirty-seven years dying in 1965. He was succeeded by his son, Prince Patrick Matthew Olimi III who reigned for a little over a year before the kingdoms in Uganda were abolished by President Milton Obote in 1967.

Omukama Patrick Matthew Olimi Kaboyo, like Kabaka Fred Muteesa of Buganda, fled into exile after Obote abolished kingdoms in Uganda in 1967.

Omukama Patrick Kaboyo ran into exile where he lived for a long time before returning home to re-ascend his throne in 1993. Similarly, the Kabaka of Buganda Ssabasajja Fredrick Muteesa was forced into exile after President Obote abolished kingdoms in 1967.  But the Kabaka never returned home alive. He died in exile in London, UK.  Meanwhile, Omukama Kaboyo died in 1995 leaving his throne to his three-year-old son Prince Oyo Nyimba Kabamba Iguru Rukidi IV who became the 12th Omukama of the nearly 200-year old Kingdom in the same year.

Omukama Oyo Nyimba Kabamba Iguru; Kabaka Daudi Chwa of Buganda

Coincidentally, the ascendance to the throne by Omukama Rukirabasaija Oyo Nyimba Kabamba Iguru Rukidi IV at a little over 3 years parallels that of Kabaka Daudi Chwa of Buganda who also assumed the throne at the same age. Kabaka Daudi Chwa is the grandfather of the present Kabaka of Buganda Ssabasajja Ronald Muwenda Mutebi. To further consolidate the historical ties between the kingdoms of Tooro and Buganda, Kabaka Ronald Mutebi was named as one of the advisors of Omukama Oyo when the latter assumed the Tooro throne in 1995. The friendship between the two kingdoms has since grown from strength to strength.

Kabaka Ronald Mutebi of Buganda has maintained the historical ties with Tooro and has played an advisory role to the young Omukama Oyo Nimba Kabamba Iguru. 

It was therefore not by mistake that the representative of the Kabaka was asked by the organizers of the first ever Children’s Christmas Program for Diaspora communities in the DFW area to come and be part of this event to welcome and introduce the Princess of Tooro to the audience. Mr. Frank Sentamu, deputy representative of the Kabaka to the area, who stood in for Dr. Abu Senkayi, did exactly that. Given the historical links between the two monarchies, you could not begrudge him.

Mr. Frank Sentamu (far left) introduced the Princess to the audience and assisted her to hand over gifts to the children and certificates to those recognized during the event.

In a brief statement released to the EADM, Dr. Abu Senkayi, the representative of the Kabaka of Buganda to the southwest region of the United States who missed the event due to a family emergency, recalled with fond memories his historical links with the Tooro kingdom and his friendship with the late Omukama Patrick Olimi Kaboyo.  Abu Senkayi, Ph.D., whose jurisdiction covers the states of Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas, New Mexico, and Louisiana stated that he planned to tell Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale about his friendship with her father, Omukama Patrick Olimi Kaboyo, during their high school days at Nyakasura School.  “I actually lived in the same dormitory, Kasagama House, with Patrick and, sometimes, we used to do homework together, an example of how close we were,” Dr. Senkayi an environmental scientist working with the USA federal government recalled.

The representative of the Kabaka of Buganda to the states of Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arkansas, and Louisiana Dr. Abu Senkayi  lived in the same dormitory, Kasagama House, with the late Omukama Patrick Olimi Kaboyo and sometimes  did homework together

Dr. Senkayi disclosed that he last met Omukama Patrick  Olimi Kaboyo in the elevator lobby of the American Embassy in Nairobi in 1973, many years since their high school days at Nyakasura.  Constantly referring to the late Omukama by his first name Patrick, to signify the close friendship Dr. Senkayi enjoyed with the fallen king, he told the  EADM that  when he traveled to Nairobi  with his wife and two young children to get his visa on the way to California for his Ph.D. studies, since the American Embassy in Kampala had closed because of Idi Amin's activities, “Patrick recognized me right away and called out my name even though it was over 10 years since our high school days.  We greeted each other, like old friends, and he asked me where I was going.  I told him that I was going to California to study and we shook hands and departed.  That was the last time I ever talked to Patrick.  May his soul rest in eternal peace,” Dr. Senkayi prayed. 

Princess Elizabeth Bagaaya of Tooro, sister to the late Omukama Patrick Olimi Kaboyo. The Senkayi family had a wonderful time with her when she visited Dallas some years ago.

Dr. Senkayi had also planned to tell Princess Komuntale about the wonderful week his family spent with Princess Elizabeth Bagaya at his home in Dallas.   “After she had heard about my close friendship with her brother Patrick during our high school days, Princess Bagaya decided to stay with my family for some time during a visit to her relatives here in Dallas,” he disclosed.   “It was a great pleasure and an honor for us to host her,” he said, adding, “when we  shared the news of her presence with our American neighbors, our neighbors told us that they had heard of Princess Bagaya because she was a famous movie star.”  Coincidentally, during the week Princess Bagaya was visiting the Senkayi family, one of the movies she starred in was showing on Channel 33. “Actually, our American neighbors alerted us about the movie and wanted to watch it with Princess Bagaya but she was not able to do so,” Dr. Senkayi recalled.

In the statement, Dr. Senkayi expressed gratitude to Rev. Kamugisha for organizing the Christmas event for the children from some of the Diaspora communities in the DFW area.  He thanked Rev. Joseph Kamugisha for all the support he has provided him before and during his tenure as the representative of the Kabaka of Buganda in the area.

It was all smiles for this young girl as she walked away with her presents, during the first ever Children's Christmas event

 “For example, I worked very closely with Rev. Kamugisha to plan for the visits of his Highness the Ssabasajja Kabaka and her Majesty the Nnabagereka of Buganda to Dallas,” he revealed. He added: “I am very glad that Rev. Kamugisha has been appointed the official Representative of the Tooro Kingdom in the region and I am looking forward to working with him in the future.”


Mr. Frank Sentamu (left) represented Dr. Abu Senkayi at the children’s event

Mr. Frank Sentamu, the deputy representative of the Kabaka to the region who stood in for Dr. Abu Senkayi, hailed the historical ties and cordial relationships that have existed between the Kingdoms of Buganda and Tooro. “The two kingdoms share similar aspirations of preserving our respective cultures, heritage, historical friendship, and prosperity in this modern and fast-paced digital era,” Mr. Sentamu told the Princess and the fully-packed room at the Quality Inn hotel.

Some of the children who attended the first ever Children's Christmas event

Mr. Frank Sentamu, a community service enthusiast challenged the children to develop a keen interest in their respective cultures and native language. “For instance, how many of you know how to greet in your respective native African languages?” he asked. In response, some of the children shouted some words in their native languages but all indications were that a lot needed to be done to help children of African Diaspora communities to learn and muster their indigenous languages.

Some children and their parents at the Children's Christmas event

After presenting gifts to all the children who gathered at the event, it was then time for the giver to receive and the receivers to give.  Three of the children were asked by the organizers to present two gifts to the Princess of Tooro, Ruth Nsemere Komuntale.   Visibly excited, the three kids presented the wrapped presents to the princess as an expression of love and joy in accordance with the time-tested Christmas tradition.

Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale of Tooro receiving presents from the children at the event.

Ms. Florence Bazanye, the vice president of the Uganda American Association of the greater Dallas-Fort Worth (UAA-DFW) area thanked the organizers of the event for giving children in the area a memorable Christmas to always cherish. Ms. Bazanye said the leadership of the UAA-DFW is ready to work with community members who come up with such events that promote love and unity among Diaspora communities in the area. “I want to particularly thank Rev. Kamugisha for organizing this event and Princess Komuntale for accepting to grace the occasion and also interact with the children,” she said.

 Princess Ruth Komuntale with Florence Bazanye at the event

Later, Princess Komuntale presented certificates of appreciation to some of the organizers of the event, some sponsors, and some well-wishers.    This is the first public event Princess Komuntale has presided over since she returned to the United States and moved to Texas over four years ago.

Princess Ruth Komuntale at the event

Now a personal banker by occupation, she currently works at Wells Fargo Bank where her responsibilities include working with numerous teams, duties which have contributed greatly to clients’ success. During the period she has spent at the bank, she has developed incredible organizational, customer relations, marketing, and leadership skills that are ensuring outstanding service for the bank’s customers. With such experiences, she continues to take part in numerous activities, giving back to the community in ways that she can. “I will always strive to enhance my skills to improve the world, educate communities, fight for those in need, and break down barriers one day at a time,” she confidently states in her bio.


Princess Komuntale with some of the people at the event

Born on February 22nd, 1989 in Kampala, Uganda, Princess Ruth Nsemere Komuntale is the daughter of the late King Mathew Patrick Kaboyo Olimi the third and Queen Best Kemigisa Olimi of the Tooro Kingdom located in western Uganda.  She is a graduate of American University in Washington Dc, United States, where she earned a    Bachelor’s degree in Women, Gender and Sexuality studies in 2012.

During her freshman’s year at the American University in 2007, she experienced what she calls “cultural shock as I was trying to get accustomed to the way of life in the USA”. Despite the cultural shock, she decided to live on campus at least for the first couple of years even though she had some family members living in the area. In retrospect, she is glad that her decision turned out to be to her advantage; she made a lot of friends and had better access to the resources on campus. “I was part of the African-diversity club that brought together Africans from across the continent. It was a great support group for most African students by helping us get accustomed to the culture in the United States. We also shared different challenges we faced as Africans living in the United States,” she recalls.

All smiles! With Princess Komuntale with some of her relatives and other attendees at the Children Christmas program

After her undergraduate studies, Princess Komuntale moved to Lesotho in southern Africa in 2013 where she participated in an internship program with the United Nations. The responsibilities of her internship team included creating awareness about sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and their prevention in schools and in communities. In addition, she was charged with writing detailed reports and keeping staff up to date on organizational activities to ensure the achievement of key objectives. In addition to that, at the end of her internship, she worked as an Independent Consultant with the Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in Lesotho.  

Princess Ruth Komuntale with some of the people at the event

Some of her responsibilities at the Catholic Relief Services included designing methodologies, compiling literature and training data collectors in addition to planning events and working with volunteers to meet organizational goals.  In 2014, she returned to the United States where she has lived to-date.

The Omukama of Tooro Kingdom Oyo Nyimba Kabamba Iguru the youngest monarch in the world, young brother to Princess Ruth Komuntale, playing with a dog

At the tender age of 3, she moved to Cuba with her parents when her father was appointed the ambassador of Uganda to the Island nation. She lived in Cuba for three years where she not only learned to speak Spanish fluently but also got acquainted her to the Cuban culture.  Three years later, after turning 6, she relocated with her family to the United Kingdom following her sister’s fatal diagnosis with leukemia which demanded more specialized medical attention. The following few years, according to Princess Komuntale, brought new challenges in her life while living in the United Kingdom where she attended Easdale along with Pointers Primary School. “As a kid, I didn’t have it easy in school due to my weight,” she recalls, adding, “Easdale was the toughest school for me due to the bullying I endured yet I had very few friends.” In comparison, she recalls that although she was teased quite a bit at Pointers, she made some friends there.  “Having many family members in London made my life outside of school bearable; life was good outside of school with a lot of great memories of family get together and fun times with cousins,” she recalls.

The late Omukama Patrick Matthew Olimi Kaboyo, father to Princess Ruth Komuntale 

But the great times were to come to an abrupt end when her sister died and shortly after, her father, Omukama Patrick Olimi Kaboyo suddenly passed away in 1995. Although Princess Komuntale and her young brother Prince Oyo had become more established within the UK system, the death of their father changed everything in their lives. After the tragic deaths, the two siblings and their mother had to make yet another move, this time, back to the motherland Uganda in 1999.

Prince Oyo Nyimba before he ascended the throne

Since her young brother Prince Oyo Nyimba was the next in the succession line to the Tooro Kingdom throne, the two had to return home for the young prince and then aged 3 years, to take over the throne.   While in Uganda, Princess Komuntale attended two primary schools; Kampala Parents School for one semester and Aga Khan Primary School where she completed her primary education.  “I was very active in the Arts while at Aga Khan; I was a member of the choir and dance team which entertained the school every Friday during our assembly. This period was a starting point of my passion for entertaining and bringing people together,” the Princess states in her biography.

Princess Ruth Komuntale, her mother, the Queen Mother of Tooro Best Kemigisa and Omukama Oyo

When Princess Ruth Komuntale turned 13 years old, she was sent to Libya where she completed her high school education at the International School of Martyrs (ISM) from the 8th to the 12th grade. Throughout her high school, she made honor roll student multiple times and graduated with honors in 2006. Beyond earning good grades, she was an active member of the school’s volleyball team that won several championships.   In Libya, she met the late President of Libya Colonel Muammar Gaddafi.  “Libya was a great experience for me and I learned lots of life lessons that I carry and draw from even today,” she reminiscences.

Princess Ruth Komuntale with some of the parents and kids who attended the Children Christmas event.

A cosmopolitan by every measure, Princess Ruth Komuntale speaks several languages including her mother tongue Rutooro, English, and Spanish. Now that she is back and living in the United States to make a fresh start, there is no role more fitting for her than that of the most authentic and eligible face of Tooro Kingdom. By all accounts, she is set and appears to fit the bill.

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